After the Interview Quick Tips

Wondering what to do after an interview? These after the interview quick tips will help you!

 

Write a Thank You Note:

For a sample, click here.

 

Follow-Up With Your References:

Immediately contact anyone who you had provided to the company as a reference. Let them know about your interview and how it went and prepare them to answer any questions that might have come up during the interview. And ask the reference to let you know if they are contacted for a reference check.

 

How and When to Follow Up With the Interviewer:

Sometimes, the interviewer won’t know the specific timetable or process for moving forward towards a job offer. Other times, the promised time for the “next step” will come and go, and you’re left wondering if you didn’t make the cut, or if another candidate received the offer. The only way to find out if you’re still in the running is to follow-up. But you don’t want to look like a pest, either. Here’s how to handle some specific situations:

  • If you were told the next step would happen by a certain date, and that date has passed. At the end of the interview, you asked the HR person or the hiring manager how he/she would prefer to be contacted. Follow their wishes. If they wanted to be contacted by email, draft a message that re-introduces yourself and reminds them of when you interviewed (and for which position). State that you were anticipating hearing from him/her by (date), and you were contacting him/her to inquire about the status of the hiring process. Have they postponed the next step and, if so, are you still being considered as a candidate? (Follow the same process if calling to follow-up.)
  • If you promised to follow-up on a certain date. If you made a promise in the interview to contact the interviewer on a certain date, make sure you do it! This is often used as a test by an interviewer. Can the applicant follow instructions? This is especially important if you were asked to send something after the interview (for example, to write a sample report, or submit a writing sample).
  • If you’ve completed several interviews and are waiting on a job offer. Often the hiring process takes longer than anticipated and the most common delay happens between the last round of interviews and when a candidate is selected for a job offer. In some cases, the decision may come down to two finalists, and one person is offered the job first. If he or she declines, you may then be offered the job. Don’t be pushy or sound desperate at this stage. Instead, be confident and helpful. A follow-up call or email at this point asks one simple question, “Do you need anything else from me to help you make the hiring decision?” You may preface that with, “I know you’re busy, and I don’t want to take up too much of your time, but I wanted to make sure you had everything from me that you needed.”

 

Remember, no matter how well the interview went, the job isn’t yours until you receive an offer, accept it, and it’s approved. Hopefully these after the interview quick tips will help you. While it’s rare for an offer to be rescinded after it’s made, it does happen. So, if you are offered a job verbally, ask for the offer in writing. The offer letter should spell out the requirements of the position and the terms of employment, including salary, benefits, reimbursement of expenses, and any conditions of agreement (for example, hiring conditional on a successful background check or credit check).

 

Note: This blog post only touches on certain aspects of this topic and is not a comprehensive list. This blog post is an educational and informational resource for job seekers and is not a substitute for working with a resume writer or other professional. See our Terms and Conditions for additional information.

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